top of page

Language Features

English (Year 12)

Rhetorical Devices

Content Writers

Christian Bien - Bloom Photo (1).jpeg

Ben Whitten

What are rhetorical devices?


Rhetorical devices are literary techniques that are used to persuade, influence or evoke a particular response from an audience. They are tools that can be used in writing and speaking to add emphasis, clarity, and interest to a message. Rhetorical devices can be used in a variety of forms of communication including speeches, essays, advertisements, and even in everyday conversation.


Some examples of rhetorical devices include:


  • Allusion: referencing a well-known person, place, event, or work, to add depth and meaning to the message.

  • Anaphora: repeating a word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses or sentences, to create emphasis and rhythm.

  • Antithesis: using contrasting words, phrases, or ideas to create a balanced effect and to show the contrast between two ideas.

  • Chiasmus: reversing the order of words in two parallel phrases, to create a balanced effect and to add emphasis.

  • Euphemism: using mild or indirect language to describe something unpleasant or taboo, to make it more palatable for the audience.

  • Hyperbole: exaggeration for emphasis or effect.

  • Irony: using language to convey the opposite of its literal or usual meaning, often for humorous or rhetorical effect.

  • Metaphor: describing something as if it were something else, to create imagery and to make a comparison.

  • Personification: giving human qualities to non-human things, to create imagery and to make a comparison.

  • Simile: comparing one thing to another, using the words "like" or "as".

  • Synecdoche: using a part of something to refer to the whole, or the whole to refer to a part, to create imagery and to make a comparison.


These are just a few examples, there are many other types of rhetorical devices. These types can be used in poetry and literature to make it more interesting and to convey certain messages. They can also be used in speeches, advertisements, and other forms of communication to persuade, influence or evoke a particular response from an audience.

Menu

You have pages remaining today.

Consider signing up, it's free!

bottom of page